Laneway housing – Small is beautiful

Photo Lanefab, bfnagy.com, bfnagy.com/clean-energy-success-blog,Downsizing is one trend that millennials and empty-nest boomers are both into. Bryn Davidson and Kamala Rao’s Lanefab company builds stunningly beautiful laneway homes in Vancouver from 300-1000 square feet. Some are net-zero and most include super-insulation, triple-pane windows, air source heat pumps, heat recovery ventilators, drain heat recovery, low flow plumbing fixtures, rainwater collection and compact outdoor spaces.

Photo Lanefab, bfnagy.com, #tinyhouses, #lanewayhousing, #laneway, clean tech, green building, small spaces, tiny houses, laneway house, downsizing, save energy, clean energy solutions, small is beautiful.

Compact geothermal in Detroit

Photo Scott Roberts, bfnagy.com, bfnagy.com/clean-energy-successScott Roberts of Niles, Michigan says everything is getting smaller and smarter, including heat pump units, ductwork when necessary, geothermal drills and drilling configurations. He was able to install direct exchange geothermal at an urban Detroit house with a 35’ x 25’ back yard. They drilled 10 diagonal loops at 75 feet each, containing highly efficient copper tube, connected to a small modern geothermal heat pump and radiant heating. The payback on the system is 7.1 years.

Photo Scott Roberts, bfnagy.com, #geothermalheat, #geothermalcooling, #geothermal, clean tech, green building, compact geothermal, geothermal, DX geothermal, direct exchange geothermal, save energy, clean energy solutions.

 

Geothermal replaces oil in upper state New York

Photo BF Nagy, bfnagy.com, bfnagy.com/clean-energy-success-blog,“In the north east geothermal has become an easy sell when compared with oil. Once we put the return on investment on paper, people get it immediately. On new construction on a big house, if you’re not installing geo, you haven’t done your homework,” says Chris Ryan, President of Geothermal Energy Options in Lagrangeville, New York. “A big house can use $1000 in oil per month in the winter. The 30% tax credit means it pays back in a few years. With oil you still need ductwork. The burner costs less, but you need a tank and you have to fill it with fuel. Says John Tesh, Director of Engineering: “Using copper tubing in the boreholes means you drill smaller holes. With geothermal you save money and reduce carbon emissions.” Geothermal also increases comfort and makes indoor air healthier to breathe.

Photo BF Nagy, bfnagy.com, #geothermalheat, #geothermalcooling, #geothermal, clean tech, green building, geothermal,Geothermal Energy Options, Chris Ryan, DX geothermal, save energy, clean energy solutions.

Retired hydro researcher installs geothermal

Photo BF Nagy, bfnagy.com, bfnagy.com/clean-energy-success-blog,Stewart Brown spent 29 years as a researcher at Ontario Hydro, so he knew a DX geothermal system at his home in Halton Hills would save him money when compared to his electric baseboard heating. It did. “I created these spreadsheets showing consumption dropped by two thirds, from about 24,000 kWh per season to about 8,000,” says Brown. He is now saving between $2200 and $2400 each year. “He also got air conditioning, which he didn’t have before,” says Al Davies, his installer. Al put in a six-ton DX system.

Photo BF Nagy, bfnagy.com, #geothermalheat, #geothermalcooling, #geothermal, clean tech, green building, geothermal, DX geothermal, save energy, clean energy solutions, Stewart Brown, Al Davies.

More than $100 Billion in green bonds

Photo BF Nagy, bfnagy.com, bfnagy.com/clean-energy-success-blog,Green bonds allow local firms, governments and global organizations to offer ethical opportunities for progressive investors to earn competitive returns, while providing funding for clean energy projects. Estimates from White & Case, an American legal firm, combined with data from Moody’s, indicates that total investment in green bonds went from $800 million in 2007 to $50 billion in 2016. A year later Moody’s reported that “Total green bond volumes for the first nine months of the year hit $94.5 billion, a 49% increase over the $63.2 billion of issuance during the first nine months of 2016.” In 2017 the World Bank reported that green-labelled bonds had grown to $118 billion and that climate-friendly projects were funded by another $576 billion in unlabled bonds.

Photo BF Nagy, bfnagy.com, #greenbonds, #greenfinance, #greeneconomy, clean tech financing, green bonds, clean energy solutions, clean energy age.

Green building retrofits in Ontario

Image Ontario government, bfnagy.com, bfnagy.com/clean-energy-suStates, provinces and municipalities all around he world, including all over North America have been doing a fairly good job of setting targets for net-zero or energy positive buildings. They have been introducing regulations and moving green building code measures along (a slow process with a 4-5 year cycle). In most places within a decade or a little more, it will not be permissible to construct new buildings that waste energy or use dirty energy systems. That’s great for new construction, but we typically replace just 3% of our building stock annually, meaning governments need to introduce strong energy retrofit programs. Many are doing this, including the Province of Ontario, which has revamped its retrofit grants. They support homeowners, small businesses and larger organizations for new windows, insulation and modern clean energy heating, cooling and plumbing. If your government or utility has not tackled this area, it should!

Image Ontario government, bfnagy.com, #cleanenergyjobs, #greenincentives, #greenbuildings, green retrofits, incentives, grants, clean tech financing, clean energy solutions.

Canadian production homebuilders

Photo BF Nagy, bfnagy.comA year ago five of the largest new home builders in Canada participated in a net-zero project with help from insulation company Owens Corning and the federal government, through the Canadian Mortgage & Housing Corporation (CMHC). The builders were located across the country from east to west, and each built 4 or 5 detached houses (and some town homes) to net-zero energy. This was a repeat of a pilot a decade earlier, but in the latest attempt the homes only cost about 5% or 10% more, especially when they were “solar ready” rather than panel equipped. Buyers snapped them up and the big builders now have a new marketing approach.

Photo BF Nagy, bfnagy.com, #greenbuildings, #net-zero, #greenhomes, clean tech, CMHC, Owens Corning, clean energy solutions, solar-ready, solar.